It is the mission of the Science Department of the Lawrenceville School to introduce students to both the beautiful simplicity and intriguing complexity of the world to foster a life-long curiosity about the world in which they live.
The Science Department will cultivate in students the understanding that scientific knowledge is characterized by empirical criteria, logical argument, and skeptical review.  It will prepare all students to use an understanding of scientific concepts and processes for personal decision making, effective participation in civic affairs, and preparation for those who choose advanced study in science beyond Lawrenceville.   In order to accomplish the above, students will develop an understanding of:
  •  Important Concepts in Science:  Students should understand fundamental theories and unifying concepts in the physical, life, and earth sciences which provide an explanation and view of the natural world around us.
  • Nature of Scientific Knowledge:  Students should understand that all scientific knowledge is provisional, subject to change and therefore often involves some degree of uncertainty. However, most core ideas in science have much experimental and observational confirmation.
  • Nature of Scientific Inquiry:  Students should understand the procedures, techniques, and methods scientists use to pose questions, plan investigations, gather data, evaluate uncertainty, develop conclusions, and communicate results.
  • Argument in Science: Students should be able to analyze, evaluate and construct arguments based on scientific reasoning using criteria for what constitutes valid, sufficient, and relevant evidence in science.
  • Quantitative Reasoning in Science: Students should understand the mathematical and statistical methods scientists use to analyze, interpret, and evaluate data and draw conclusions.

Environmental Studies Program

Students use the campus—700 acres of fields, streams, marshes, forests, and ponds—as an outdoor laboratory for environmental studies. The program, founded in honor of the famous conservationist Aldo Leopold (Class of 1905), includes: outings—hikes and canoe trips led by two veteran experiential educators into the nearby Pinelands wilderness and the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area surrounding the Appalachian Trail.

Explore Our Courses

  • SC205 - Inquiries in Biological and Environmental Sciences

    As important as asking "What do you know?" students in Inquiries in Biological and Environmental Science (IBES) at Lawrenceville ask "How do you know?" IBES explores `the complexities of the inquiry process scientists employ to generate knowledge in the fields of ecology, evolution, physiology, and genetics, with primary emphasis placed on the foundational understandings of biology. Inquiries in Biological and Environmental Sciences is a required three-term course that forms the first year of our core science program. There is no honors or advanced track. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All
  • SC325 - Inquiries in Chemical and Physical Sciences

    Inquiries in Chemical and Physical Sciences (ICPS) is a laboratory science course in which students investigate the relationship between motion, forces and energy as a foundation for learning about the composition of matter and the physical and chemical changes it undergoes. It is the second year of our core science program and prepares students for all higher level science courses. Students study gravitational and electrostatic forces as well as the fundamental structure of atoms, the way atoms combine to form compounds, and the interactions between matter and energy. This course focuses on quantitative measurement, dimensional units, and experimental variability. Students are expected to expand their capabilities to use a range of tools for tabulation, graphical representation, visualization, and statistical analysis. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: III Form and above; Prereqs: SC205
  • SC413 - Evolution Of Reproduction

    In nature, it's not enough to survive. A species must also reproduce to ensure passing some of its genetics to the next generation. This course uncovers the evolutionary influence on reproduction, both sexual and asexual, with emphasis on how natural selection has shaped human reproductive anatomy and physiology. Studies of comparative anatomy across species and the genetic basis of reproductive behaviors will illuminate the reproduction and survival of the human species. Grants: NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC414 - Human Disease

    This case-based approach to learning human physiology and anatomy examines the evolutionary basis of genetic diseases and their interactions with contagious diseases. Students will develop critical thinking skills as they use differential diagnosis to collect and analyze information about simulated patients afflicted with a variety of health problems.
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC415 - Human Anatomy And Physiology

    This hands-on course will develop a deep understanding of human anatomy and physiology. As a class students will focus on how the musculoskeletal system, digestive system, blood work together to maintain homeostasis. Students will use a combination of building scale models out of clay and dissections each week to understand the relevant anatomy. Students will have a capstone project on the system of their choice and connect this body system to a larger social justice issue. Grants: NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC421 - Forensic Science

    This laboratory based course is designed to introduce the student to the scientific aspects of forensic investigation as well as ethical issues facing the forensic scientist. Topics include a broad range of forensic procedures such as the physical methods for analyzing fingerprints, impression investigations including casting footprints, dental impressions, tool marks and ballistics, fiber and hair comparison and analysis, blood spatter and more. Controversial cases such as JonBenet Ramsey and OJ Simpson are investigated and discussed. Students will also experience some of the analytical and instrumental methods used in investigating crimes. Grants NCAA; Term: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC422 – Extensions in Forensic Science

    This course applies the principles learned in SC421. This course will also build upon the previously learned skills and introduce new forensic techniques such as blood spatter, drug ID and toxicology, crime scene reconstruction and psychological profiling. The course will culminate with the investigation of a crime scene and a final poster presentation based on a case of interest. Grants NCAA; Term: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC421 or Department Approval
  • SC431 - Conceptual Physics

    The goal of this course is to provide the basic conceptual understanding of physics without requiring advanced levels of math. Topics to be covered include: basic science skills, Newton’s laws, linear motion, momentum, work, energy and waves (light and sound). Students will work to answer questions by developing models and arguments to support their conclusions.  Students will learn physical principles through hands-on investigations, including dropping objects from various stories, performing collisions, using air tracks and more.  Students may switch to Astronomy SC437 in the spring. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval and MA301
  • SC432 - Conceptual Physics

    WINTER CLASS 
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval and MA301
  • SC433 - Conceptual Physics

    SPRING CLASS 
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval and MA301
  • SC437 - Astronomy

    This course will introduce students to the scope of the cosmos - stellar birth and death, galaxy formation and evolution, and the beginning, structure, and ultimate fate of the universe. Specific topics will include the big bang, stellar evolution, dark matter, cosmology, neutron stars and black holes. There may be some night classes in the observatory using the telescope. Students may take Astronomy in place of the spring term of SC533 Physics or SC431 Conceptual Physics. Grants: NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325
  • SC438 - Physics for Future Presidents

    A growing number of important topics in society today are governed by physics and technology. Whether you are the president of a nation, a leader of an organization, or just a regular citizen trying to cast an educated vote, you may be confronted with crucial decisions involving questions such as: What should the USA do about our stockpile of nuclear weapons? How much, and to what degree, should we invest in the space program? How do we balance our desire to curb climate change with our desire for economic growth? This course aims to provide you with the resources to tackle these questions and more by relying on science and information rather than opinions and misconceptions. Topics may include: energy, nuclear weapons, space travel, climate change, and national security. The course will assume a basic understanding of algebra, but will focus on a conceptual understanding of the content. Grants: NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and MA404 or Departmental Approval
  • SC441 - Chemistry

    This course is a comprehensive study of chemistry that will dive deeper into the introductory chemistry concepts covered in Inquiries in Chemical and Physical Sciences while also providing an opportunity to explore new and exciting topics in the world of chemistry.  This course will serve as a chemistry option “instead of” the 500 level Honors Chemistry course not “in preparation for” that course. This option will provide students who have a genuine interest in chemistry a year-long experience with the subject matter while working towards successful completion of the SAT Chemistry Subject Test. A highly student driven course, the instructor will focus on both deep learning and skills as the class moves through the curriculum. Laboratory experiences will constitute an important part of this course both to reinforce laboratory skills and enhance students' understanding of the material. Topics include, but are not limited to: measurement, matter and its changes, atomic structure and bonding, the mole, stoichiometry, reactions in aqueous solutions, acids and bases, thermodynamics, equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC442 - Chemistry

    WINTER CLASS 
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC443 - Chemistry

    SPRING CLASS 
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC451 - Biology

    This course is a comprehensive study of biology that will incorporate chemistry concepts covered in ICPS, further develop concepts from IBES, and provide an opportunity to explore connections and relationships in the living world.  This course will serve as a biology option “instead of” the 500 level Honors Biology course, “not in preparation for” that course. Students with a genuine interest in biology can use this year-long experience with the subject to work toward successful completion of the SAT Biology Subject Test.  Laboratory experiences will constitute an important part of this course, both to reinforce laboratory skills and to enhance students' understanding of the material. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC452 - Biology

    WINTER CLASS Grants: NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC453 - Biology

    SPRING CLASS GGrants: NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC462 - Environmental Science

    This course is a two-term comprehensive study of environmental science that builds off the skills and concepts covered in our core science program.  It serves as an environmental science option instead of the 500 level Honors Environmental Science course rather than in preparation for that course. The goal of Environmental Science is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.  The course embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study, yet there are several major unifying themes that cut across the many topics.  Laboratory experiences and fieldwork will be an important component of this course that provide students with opportunities to test concepts and principles introduced in the classroom, explore specific problems in depth, and gain an awareness of the importance of confounding variables that exist in the "real world". Topics include: how energy conversions underlie all ecological processes, why the Earth itself is one interconnected system, how humans alter natural systems, environmental problems that have a cultural and social context, and how human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems. Grants: NCAA; Terms: T2 and T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 or Department Approval
  • SC507 - Human Evolution

    What makes us human? We will explore this question from a biological perspective by tracing the appearance of our earliest ancestors to the emergence of our own species. Evolutionary theory, behavioral ecology, genetics, and functional morphology, in combination with hands-on examination of fossil replicas, are used to reconstruct how and why humans evolved. Emphasis is placed on developing a broader biological framework for the study of human adaptation and evolution, and evolved human traits that were once advantageous but have become maladaptive in modern environments.
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC508 - The Biological Roots Of Human Behavior

    Human behavior is considered in a broad evolutionary context, exploring how behavior can be informed by evolutionary theory and comparative evidence. Behavior is traced from its evolutionary function as adaptation, through its physiological basis and associated psychological mechanisms, to its expression. Students will develop and conduct their own research projects on human behavior. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC511 - Honors Ecology

    Students will examine the structure and dynamics of local ecological systems, exploring how organisms interact with their environment. A large portion of class and lab time will be spent in campus forests, fields, farmland, and ponds, learning to identify and explain patterns in nature. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC513 - Field Botany

    This one-term course is offered annually during the fall. The primary objectives of this course are to introduce you to plant evolution and provide you with the basic skills in technical plant collection and identification. This is a field-based course with the expectation that you will explore natural areas on campus while developing a plant collection. The course is based on evolutionary classification (phylogenetics) with units on flower diversity, pollination biology, and fruit diversity. Grants: Honors; Terms: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC516 - Honors Biology

    This second-year course in biology will grow and mature students' ability to think as a biologist. Over the yearlong course of study, students will develop an understanding of how particular themes in the study of life are expressed within different levels of structural complexity from the subcellular to the biosphere. Terms will be based on important biological themes, such as how biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis. Understanding of these biological themes will be discussed and assessed in the context of authentic problems. Students will be able to apply and extend their understanding as a biologist, including the design and performance of experiments, when encountering both familiar and novel problems. If you are planning to take both Honors Chemistry and Honors Biology at Lawrenceville, we suggest that you take Honors Chemistry before Honors Biology, but it is not required. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V, and Department Approval
  • SC517 - Honors Biology

    WINTER CLASS Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V, and Department Approval
  • SC518 - Honors Biology

    SPRING CLASS Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V, and Department Approval
  • SC522 - Honors Chemistry

    This course is a comprehensive study of chemistry that begins with the Big Bang and nuclear chemistry and includes topics such as the structure of the atom, bonding, molecular structure, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, and acid-base chemistry. Laboratory experiences will constitute an important part of this course both to reinforce laboratory skills and enhance students' understanding of the material. If you are planning to take both Honors Chemistry and Honors Biology at Lawrenceville, we suggest that you take Honors Chemistry before Honors Biology but it is not required. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC523 - Honors Chemistry

    WINTER CLASS 
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC524 - Honors Chemistry

    SPRING CLASS 
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC526 - Research In Applied Chemistry

    This is a two-term course where students must enroll in both the fall and winter terms. There are many ways to observe and apply the principles of chemistry, engineering, and medicine as an integrated science study.  For example, hot peppers get their heat from a molecule called capsaicin and may have a use as a painkiller for those suffering from arthritis. Here at Lawrenceville, Research in Applied Chemistry students during the first term learn research methods and discuss primary literature papers and research topics. Students will break into small groups, decide on essential questions to research and will create a research proposal. The class will learn all of the applied chemistry, materials synthesis, and engineering techniques necessary to investigate their project. Topics such as nanomaterials, small molecule purification science, enzyme chemistry of chemical kinetics, and phytoremediation of toxins from the environment, will be learned. The direction of the research will determine the specific techniques taught, such as high-performance liquid and gas chromatography, materials science, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). During the second term, students will refine their research proposal and implement their experiments in the lab under the supervision of the teacher. This will culminate with a scientific paper and presentation. This course is open to Forms IV and V with departmental approval, but priority will be given to those who have already taken a 500 level course. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1 and T2; Forms: IV or V Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC531 - Physics

    In this yearlong introductory course, students uncover the basic principles of physics through the study of motion (kinematics, dynamics, and momentum), energy, electrostatics, and waves (sound and light). Topics may also include aspects of modern physics, magnetism, circuits, and optics. The development of quantitative analytical skills through mathematical problem-solving is emphasized. Students who have demonstrated strong algebra skills in Math 3 (MA301) or in Math 4 (MA404) may take Physics with permission. Students may elect to take SC437 Astronomy in place of Physics during the spring term. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA407 or as described, and Department Approval
  • SC532 - Physics

    WINTER CLASS 
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA407 or as described, and Department Approval
  • SC533 - Physics

    SPRING CLASS 

    Grants: NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA407 or as described, and Department Approval
  • SC544 - Physics / Mechanics

    This yearlong introductory calculus-based physics course adopts a thematic approach to physics with an emphasis on conservation laws in mechanics. Topics will include kinematics (how things move), dynamics (why things move), energy, and momentum for linear and rotational motion, with an additional focus on how relativity and quantum mechanics shape our understanding of the world. The course will require significant quantitative analytical skills which will be developed via labs and problem solving. Students will also be introduced to coding and computational modeling. Calculus will be used throughout. Students need to have completed a 500-level calculus course previously, or take 500-level calculus concurrently with this course. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA504 or MA521 concurrent, and Department Approval
  • SC545 - Physics / Mechanics

    WINTER CLASS 
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA504 or MA521, and Department Approval
  • SC546 - Physics / Mechanics

    SPRING CLASS 
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA504 or MA521, and Department Approval
  • SC557 - Honors Physics / Mechanics

    An intensive three-term introductory physics course covering classical mechanics (translational and rotational kinematics and dynamics, energy, statics, harmonic motion, and gravitation); relativity; elementary Lagrangian dynamics. Spring term topics may include aspects of quantum theory, modern physics, and cosmology; and possibly a limited selection of fluid dynamics, thermal physics, nuclear decay and dosimetry, optics, or other topics based on time and student interest. The development of quantitative analytical skills through mathematical problem-solving is emphasized; proficiency with algebra, trigonometry, and calculus (MA504 or MA521) is a prerequisite. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA504 or MA521, and Department Approval
  • SC558 - Honors Physics / Mechanics

    WINTER CLASS 
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA504 or MA521, and Department Approval
  • SC559 - Honors Physics / Mechanics

    SPRING CLASS 
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA504 or MA521, and Department Approval
  • SC562 - Intro to Engineering

    From the Internet to self-driving cars, engineering is revolutionizing every aspect of our lives. With many problems in modern society requiring solutions based on engineering, it is becoming increasingly important that responsible citizens understand its foundations. This course introduces students to the principles of engineering, with a focus on electrical engineering. Students will learn the basics of circuitry and coding, and then gain experience in embedded design by programming an Arduino microcontroller to solidify their learning. The Arduino will interface with sensors, simple circuits, and the real world through mini-projects, such as programming a car to follow a certain path. After completing this course, students have the option to further their studies in course SC563. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC563 - Projects in Engineering

    This course applies the principles learned in SC562. Students will work in small groups to propose a term-long engineering project of their own design, and then spend the majority of the course working to accomplish their goals. The nature of this course focuses on group collaboration and requires self-motivation.  Past projects include an EKG machine that vibrates when your pulse falls below a threshold value, an aeroponics system that adjusts its misting schedule based on the temperature in the air, a laser harp that plays different notes when a laser beam is blocked, and a tank that shoots a projectile whenever it sees a target of a certain color. Grants: Honors NCAA; T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC562 and Department Approval
  • SC571 - Research and Social Justice

    Students will engage in campus-based social justice research, under the mentorship of Lawrenceville faculty and faculty from the Center for the Study of Boys’ and Girls’ Lives at the University of Pennsylvania. Students will examine the principles of social research design. Then students will 1) identify areas of interest to students about social justice in the school community; 2) investigate those areas systematically – both quantitatively and qualitatively; 3) report research results to targeted constituents of the school community; and, 4) using the results of their research, develop and implement strategies to improve student life at Lawrenceville. Grants: Honors NCAA; Term: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC573 - Sustainability Seminar

    This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore concepts of sustainable development through campus-centered case studies. Bridging the gap between readings and the complex reality of current issues, we aim to think creatively to solve real world problems that exist at Lawrenceville and in the Greater Trenton area such as water pollution, equitable access to food, energy use, and carbon emissions. Students will work in teams to develop proposals for sustainability projects on campus. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC574 - Research in Molecular Genetics

    This course, run in conjunction with the Seung Kim Laboratory at the Stanford School of Medicine, will allow students to use transposon biology to create transgenic fruit flies. These novel lines of flies can potentially be used as tools in professional labs around the world that are interested in doing tissue specific genetic manipulation. In the fall term, students create the transgenic lines of flies. In the winter term, students will use a variety of molecular techniques to characterize their fly lines. Both fall and winter terms will place a heavy emphasis on reading and presenting primary literature. This is a two term course, with an optional third term extension. The third term optional extension will allow students to continue their projects in the lab, focusing on larval dissection and fluorescent microscopy. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1 and T2; Forms: IV or V; Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Preference will go to rising fifth form students who have completed one year of a 500 level science course.
  • SC575 - Projects in Molecular Genetics

    This course is the optional 3rd term extension of the Research in Molecular Genetics run in conjunction with the Seung Kim Laboratory at the Stanford University School of Medicine. It will allow students to continue their individual projects in a mainly lab-based setting. This includes fruit fly larval brain dissection and fluorescent microscopy to characterize the transgenic fly line created in SC574. To sign up for this course, the student must have taken the Research in Molecular Genetics course held in the fall and winter terms. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prerequisites: SC574 and Departmental approval. Preference will go to rising fifth form students who have completed one year of a 500 level science course.
  • SC576 - Research Methods in Molecular Systematics

    This one-term course is offered annually during the winter. Molecular systematics is the use of DNA sequence data to study the evolution of relationships among individuals and species. Students will engage in a research project based on the generation of original DNA sequence data to provide insights into the evolutionary history of tropical plants. Specimens used for this course originated from field-expeditions carried out by Lawrentians to the Neotropics. Students will become proficient in gel electrophoresis and PCR. The class will combine matrices from original data generated during labs and incorporate publicly available sequence data from GenBank. Additional skills covered in the course include sequence alignment and the generation of evolutionary trees. The term-end goal of this course is the generation of a phylogenetic hypothesis to evaluate current classifications. Insights from previous projects have discovered new species to science and formed the basis for current generic concepts of poorly known plant groups. Grants: Honors; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V, and Department Approval.
  • SC577 - Research Methods in Biodiversity

    This one-term course is offered annually during the spring. The objective of this course is to promote local flora and fauna using modern methods in taxonomy and biodiversity. Students will develop skills in digital photography using a DSLR. Students will develop a collaborative research project, including how to conduct a literature search to identify and refine a research question, develop testable hypotheses, conduct background research, and implement a field project. Taxonomic and biodiversity databases will allow students to develop an understanding of local biodiversity. An essential goal of this course is developing skills in reaching out to a broader community of systematists to increase and enhance our understanding of local flora and fauna. This course incorporates primary literature in systematics and biodiversity. Grants: Honors; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V, and Department Approval
  • SC584 - Honors Environmental Science

    This course increases student knowledge of the scientific concepts and skills that can be applied to today's environmental challenges by connecting a variety of disciplines, including biology, geology, chemistry, meteorology, and physics. During the fall term, students focus on the study of the biosphere through units on population, community, and ecosystem dynamics and begin to consider how humans affect ecosystems.  In the winter, students learn about Earth's physical systems, including the hydrosphere, atmosphere, and geosphere. In the spring, we connect this foundation in environmental science to the study of anthropogenic impacts on Earth systems, culminating in an independent research project. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC585 - Honors Environmental Science

    WINTER CLASS 
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC586 - Honors Environmental Science

    SPRING CLASS 
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC590 - Learning And Memory

    How do you learn? Why do you remember your favorite song lyrics but struggle to remember important details for your upcoming test? To help you answer these questions and more, this course will help you to develop fundamental understandings of memory, attention, neuroscience, and cognitive psychology. In the pursuit of these understandings, you will read primary literature and conduct psychological lab activities. Furthermore, you will learn to apply these ideas to personal academic life and important considerations beyond the classroom. Having discussed these topics as a class, you will then pursue an individual interest in the field of learning and memory through a significant independent research project. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
  • SC599 - Ind. Study: Science

    Students interested in original laboratory research in science should submit a proposal and enlist the support of a science faculty member to apply for this course. All projects must be approved by the Department Chair and the Dean of Academics. Research can be completed on or off campus at a local university or in industry. Students will meet weekly with their faculty mentor and complete an advanced course load (10-12 hours/week). Final oral and poster presentation is required at the end of term poster session. Grants: Honors; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: Completion of three terms of a 500 level course and Department Approval
  • IN531 - Honors Physics With Calculus

    Through an inquiry-based approach, this course explores key principles of physics and the calculus methods related to them. The study of each physics topic requires students to create hypotheses, develop computer models, design experiments, and craft components. Topics of calculus are introduced in support of this process, allowing students to model their understanding mathematically. Among the physics topics included are translational, orbital, and rotational motion, conservation laws, friction, and electrostatics. General and limiting physical behaviors will be explored mathematically and computationally. No previous programming experience is expected; Javascript is taught as a tool for exploring course topics. Grants: Honors Interdisciplinary NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA407 or MA421 and SC325 co-requirement with IN530, and Department Approval.**NOTE: Only one IN credit will be granted for the pair.
  • IN558 - Bioethics

    Pick up a newspaper.  Flick on Fox or MSNBC.  What do you see?  Bioethical dilemmas… everywhere.  Should the government quarantine health workers returning home from fighting Ebola?  Should we treat infected people with experimental drugs?  Should parents vaccinate their children against measles and pertussis?  Is it a problem if they decide to opt-out?  Then, there are those perennial favorites:  Abortion.  Death-with-Dignity.  Human Enhancement.  Even if you try to avoid the news, change your homepage to Facebook, and hide under a virtual rock… you won’t escape bioethics.  All you have to do is go to Abbott for lunch.  Should you eat that juicy hamburger?  Or spare the cow and make a hummus sandwich, instead?   What is Right?  How do you know?  And what should you do about it?  This two-term course challenges students to blend science and ethics to develop thoughtful positions on complex issues. Grants: Honors Interdisciplinary NCAA 2IN/1SC/1RP Cr.; Terms: T2 and T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and any 400 or 500 level Religion and Philosophy (RP) course.
  • IN560 - Race

    Race is both a biological myth and a social reality. Human biological variation is not reducible to race, yet the idea of race continues to have a profound effect on the lives we live. This course explores race through biological, historical, psychological and social perspectives. We will examine the science of human biological variation, the construction of the idea of race, and the impact of that idea on Western society, particularly the United States. Grants: Honors; Interdisciplinary NCAA; 1IN/1SC Cr.; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC321 or SC325 and Department Approval
  • IN562 - Food Studies

    In Food Studies, we address the questions "What is the significance and value of food to humans?" and "How do we know that?"   All animals need food; humans, however, have elevated this basic biological requirement to a symbol of cultural significance and value.  We'll seek answers from history, biology, geography, anthropology, environmental studies, visual art, literature, technology, politics, economics, ethics, and will remain open to other fields of inquiry and discovery. Grants: Honors Interdisciplinary 1IN/1SC Cr.; Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval
     
  • IN572 - Water and Humanity:A Collaborative Study

    This one term course grants one interdisciplinary credit and one science credit. Water and Humanity examines the dynamic and tenuous relationship between water resources and human development. Looking at water from a multidisciplinary perspective, this course will enable students to think more critically about the central role water has played and must continue to play in the viability and vitality of all civilizations. Students will encounter diverse materials, use holistic approaches, and engage in innovative project planning to consider, understand, and propose solutions to complex water issues. This course uses a project based learning approach to learning and assessment. There will be fieldwork involved in your studies and field trips to local watersheds. You will be involved in student-to-student collaboration, guided lessons, field research, and multimedia readings and videos. The course is a project based learning program with three modules that culminate in a capstone project at the end of the term. The course will focus upon the value of water and water issues within the contexts of religious ceremony, politics, economics, science and climate, sustainability, and industrial development. This interdisciplinary, project-driven course will also encourage students to think about the place of water in their own local, regional, and global communities, while researching and proposing their own solutions to complex multidisciplinary water issues. It is through collaborative projects that students will enjoy the advantages of this in-depth and interdisciplinary endeavor. A central methodology for the course is to enable students to engage in dialogue and collaboration with other students and faculty with the goal of furthering students’ thinking and conclusions about the central dilemmas this course explores. Students enrolled in this course need to have completed their science requirement. Grants: Honors Interdisciplinary 1IN/1SC Cr.; Terms: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: SC325 and Department Approval

Our Faculty

Through House and Harkness, Lawrenceville challenges a diverse community of promising young people to lead lives of learning, integrity, and high purpose.  Our mission is to inspire the best in each to seek the best for all.