Lawrenceville Mourns the Passing of Dr. Philip H. Jordan Jr. ’50 H’61 ’96 P’85 ’90 GP’24

It is with sadness that the School announces the passing of tenth Head Master of The Lawrenceville School, trustee, and trustee emeritus Dr. Philip H. Jordan Jr. ’50 H’61 ’96 P’85 ’90 GP’24.
 
Dr. Jordan graduated as valedictorian from Lawrenceville in 1950. He went on to receive a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Princeton University in 1954 and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in history from Yale University.
 
After leaving Yale, Jordan accepted a position in the history department at Connecticut College, where he taught American and Modern European history. He was awarded the Salgo-Noren prize for excellence in teaching in 1965 and he entered the administration of the college in 1968 as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. After holding this position for a year, Jordan became Dean of the Faculty at Connecticut College until 1974, when he was chosen to become President of Kenyon College.
 
Jordan’s tenure at Kenyon was one of great accomplishments. Early in his presidency, he worked to expand the college fully to integrate women. In an article he wrote for The New York Times in 1977, he explained that “the leaders in the education of women must be the coeducational colleges, where women can play an active part in working out new roles, aspire to previously closed careers and assert themselves properly in the company of men.” The time of Jordan’s administration also saw the increase of diversity of Kenyon’s faculty and students, as well as the doubling of applicants, raising Kenyon’s standards and giving it its high academic reputation. He retired in 1995, after 20 years as Kenyon’s president.
 
When Head Master Si Bunting H’37 ’59 ’88 ’91 ’95 P’88 ’97 resigned in 1995, the Board of Trustees asked Jordan to become the tenth Head Master of Lawrenceville while they conducted a search for the next leader. He served as Head Master for one year, where he continued to refine and improve upon the growing co-educational and residential life at Lawrenceville. He returned to live at Kenyon and in the summer of 2000, he and his wife Sheila moved to Chebeague Island, Maine.
 
As an alumnus, Jordan served as a trustee from 1979 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002; he was elected trustee emeritus in 1992. He was awarded the Aldo Leopold Award in 1996. 
 
Jordan is survived by his wife, Sheila H’66 P’85 ’90 GP’24; two sons, Philip H. Jordan III ’85 P’24, a religion and philosophy teacher and the Diana C. Bunting and Josiah Bunting III Distinguished Teaching Chair at Lawrenceville, and John G. Jordan II ’90. He is also survived by a current Lawrentian grandchild, Adrian Jordan ’24. 
 
Details about services and celebrations of Jordan’s life and contributions to Lawrenceville, Connecticut College, and Kenyon College, will be shared with the community when they become available.