The mission of the Foreign Language Department at the Lawrenceville School is to support students as they become citizens of the global community.
Our curriculum is designed to develop the capacity to understand other cultures and people through the beauty and power of their languages. It is the capacity for language, for complex symbolic communication that is, arguably, what makes us human. Thus, to learn a foreign language is not only useful, allowing us to accomplish tasks, to coordinate work and play, but it is also deeply personal, giving us the means to share our hidden interior lives with other human beings.
 
Finally, to learn a foreign language means to see and understand the world in a new way, to adopt, even temporarily, a new perspective. It is only when we encounter and interact with another culture that we can truly understand our own. For many students, learning a foreign language is the first time that they realize what makes their language, their culture, and even themselves, unique.

Explore Our Courses

  • LA201 - French 1

    This yearlong course introduces basic vocabulary and sentence structure, fundamental verb structures, and the beginning pronunciation and oral structures of French, which will enable students to follow future courses using the target language only. Students develop elementary reading, writing and conversation skills while working with the present and past tense. Students also begin to develop their cultural understanding and fluency through a series of presentational projects that introduce them to the French-speaking world. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All
  • LA211 - Spanish 1

    In this introductory yearlong course, students are introduced to the basics of Spanish pronunciation and oral structures. Students are exposed to the aural-oral as well as the writing fundamentals which will enable them to follow future courses using the target language only. For written proficiency, students progressively develop writing skills from sentence to paragraph. In the winter term, students study fundamental verb structures and read and write at an elementary level. In the spring, the course develops basic language skills at the sentence level and introduces the past tense. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All
  • LA221 - Chinese 1

    This yearlong course introduces rudimentary pronunciation rules, character writing skills and simple sentence structures. Students learn the aural-oral fundamentals, which enables them to follow future courses using the target language only. The course develops basic reading, writing and conversational skills at the sentence level, while developing cultural awareness through common daily topics such as greeting, family, hobbies, and school life. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All
  • LA241 - Latin 1

    This course provides students with a thorough introduction to the Latin language and to the history and culture of the Romans and Ancient Greeks. Through regular short readings and written exercises, students in Latin 1 develop their knowledge of Latin grammar and usage, while building a foundational vocabulary of common Latin words, phrases, and idioms. They also begin to appreciate how much Latin has influenced both the English language and Western history over the course of the last two millennia. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All
  • LA301 - French 2

    This yearlong intermediate level course builds upon a mastery of the basic syntax, lexicon, and communicative skills of French 1. Students develop more nuanced expression for describing the past, as well as the future in both written and spoken forms. In addition to continuing to emphasize aural-oral skills, students develop the ability to describe and narrate in paragraphs. Short stories provide a scaffold and framework for longer, more sophisticated oral and written work. Students broaden their cultural understanding and fluency through a series of presentational projects structured around selected themes within the French-speaking world. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA201
  • LA311 - Spanish 2

    In this yearlong course students learn intermediate language structures. Oral practice of a more advanced nature begins, as well as increased reading and writing practice, including narration and the compositions of paragraphs. In the winter term, the course focuses on narrating past events using preterit and imperfect tenses. In the spring term, the composition of more sophisticated essays begins. Short stories provide a scaffold and framework for longer and more sophisticated oral and written work. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA211
  • LA321 - Chinese 2

    This yearlong course provides students with opportunities to continue to develop fundamental aural-oral skills through exposing them to a variety of common daily topics such as shopping, transportation, weather, dining, and visiting doctors. Students begin to develop paragraph-level writing proficiency and compound sentence structures are introduced. The target language is used as the language of instruction. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA221
  • LA341 - Latin 2

    This course builds on students’ prior knowledge of Latin and of the ancient world. Through regular reading assignments and written exercises, students in Latin 2 strive to develop their knowledge of Latin syntax and grammar, while continuing to expand their vocabulary. They also explore Latin’s influence on both the English language and on Western history, in general. The goal of this course is to prepare students for reading literature in Latin 3. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA241 or equivalent with permission of instructor.
  • LA401 - French 3

    This yearlong upper-intermediate course provides students the opportunity to hone their speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competencies through a selection of textual and audio-visual materials. Organized thematically, this course allows students to interact with materials that include, but are not limited to, short stories from francophone literature, current magazine articles, radio and television broadcasts, and film. One of the primary objectives of this course is to provide students with a deeper understanding of cultural similarities and differences between their own culture(s) and francophone cultures. In service to that goal, students review and expand the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the language. Assessment focuses on their ability to transfer those linguistic skills to meaningful cultural contexts through a series of written and oral presentations. You must sign up for LA402 and LA403 for Winter and Spring. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA301
  • LA402 - French 3

    WINTER CLASS You must sign up for LA401 and LA403 for Fall and Spring. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA401
  • LA403 - French 3

    SPRING CLASS You must sign up for LA401 and LA402 for Fall and Winter Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA402
  • LA411 - Spanish 3

    This yearlong upper intermediate course continues to refine students' level of both written and spoken discourse. Fluidity and flexibility of expression is developed and the introduction of more complex sentence structures begins. Students continue reading short stories of Spanish and Latin American authors. This course will be the completion of their last mandatory year of Spanish instruction at Lawrenceville. You must sign up for LA412 and LA413 for Winter and Spring. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA311
  • LA412 - Spanish 3

    WINTER COURSE You must sign up for LA411 and LA413 for Fall and Spring. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA411
  • LA413 - Spanish 3

    SPRING COURSE You must sign up for LA411 and LA412 for Fall and Winter. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA412
  • LA421 - Chinese 3

    This yearlong course continues to build students' comprehensive skills in listening, speaking, and reading, as well as writing at the intermediate level. More complex sentence structures are introduced to support intermediate level writing. Concurrently, students learn to focus on subtleties with regard to the usage and meaning of words and sentences. Students begin to compose Chinese essays on familiar topics. Supplementary reading materials are introduced more frequently and students watch some media materials to enrich their knowledge of Chinese culture. You must sign up for LA422 and LA423 for Winter and Spring. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA321
  • LA422 - Chinese 3

    WINTER CLASS You must sign up for LA421 and LA423 for Fall and Spring. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA421
  • LA423 - Chinese 3

    SPRING CLASS You must sign up for LA421 and LA422 for Fall and Winter. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA422
  • LA441 - Latin 3

    In this yearlong course, students begin to explore the vast world of Latin literature. They study texts drawn from a variety of authors, in order to develop their ability to discuss, critique, and appreciate ancient literature. At the same time, students review some of the more challenging concepts of Latin grammar. The goal of this course is prepare students for either Advanced Latin or Honors Latin. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA341 or equivalent with permission of instructor.
  • LA442 - Latin 3

    WINTER CLASS You must sign up for LA441 and LA443 for Fall and Spring. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA441 or equivalent
  • LA443 - Latin 3

    SPRING CLASS You must sign up for LA441 and LA442 for Fall and Winter. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: LA442 or equivalent
  • LA501 - Advanced Latin I

    In this advanced reading course, students continue to explore the vast world of Latin literature by studying representative examples from many literary genres (including history, poetry, philosophy, and oratory). In addition to reading ancient texts, students also read select pieces of modern scholarship. This course prepares students for Honors Latin. Grants: Honors Terms: T1; Forms: All Prereqs: LA441, LA452 or permission of the instructor.
  • LA502 - Advanced Latin II

    In this advanced reading course, students continue to explore the vast world of Latin literature by studying representative examples from many literary genres (including history, poetry, philosophy, and oratory). In addition to reading ancient texts, students also read select pieces of modern scholarship. This course prepares students for Honors Latin. Grants: Honors Terms: T2; Forms: All Prereqs: LA501 or permission of the instructor.
  • LA503 - Advanced Latin III

    In this advanced reading course, students continue to explore the vast world of Latin literature by studying representative examples from many literary genres (including history, poetry, philosophy, and oratory). In addition to reading ancient texts, students also read select pieces of modern scholarship. This course prepares students for Honors Latin. Grants: Honors Terms: T3; Forms: All Prereqs: LA502 or permission of the instructor.
  • LA504 - Advanced Chinese I

    The Advanced Chinese sequence addresses listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at an intermediate mid to high level. Texts at this level continue to introduce advanced structures and vocabulary words. Common phrases, as well as colloquial and idiomatic expressions, will be included. Content will make the transition from daily-life topics to more sophisticated topics like education or geography. Students will start to develop the skills of distinguishing between formal and informal language. Presentational skills and essay writing skills will be polished. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: All Prereqs: LA421
  • LA505 - Advanced Chinese II

    The Advanced Chinese sequence addresses listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at an intermediate mid to high level. Texts at this level continue to introduce advanced structures and vocabulary words. Common phrases, as well as colloquial and idiomatic expressions, will be included. Content will make the transition from daily-life topics to more sophisticated topics like education or geography. Students will start to develop the skills of distinguishing between formal and informal language. Presentational skills and essay writing skills will be polished. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: All Prereqs: LA504
  • LA506 - Advanced Chinese III

    The Advanced Chinese sequence addresses listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at an intermediate mid to high level. Texts at this level continue to introduce advanced structures and vocabulary words. Common phrases, as well as colloquial and idiomatic expressions, will be included. Content will make the transition from daily-life topics to more sophisticated topics like education or geography. Students will start to develop the skills of distinguishing between formal and informal language. Presentational skills and essay writing skills will be polished. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: All Prereqs: LA505
  • LA507 - Advanced French I

    This advanced level course provides students an opportunity to hone their speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competencies through accessible Francophone literature and media. Targeted intensive grammar review and vocabulary development allow students to become more adept and flexible users of the language. To that end, composition work and the development of oral production skills are essential aspects of this course. Assessment focuses on their ability to transfer those linguistic skills to meaningful cultural contexts through a series of written and oral presentations. Each term, students will share one of their presentations with the greater community. This course will prepare students to take a 500-level French course in the fall term. Practice with the format and content of the SAT II exam is included when appropriate. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: All Prereqs: LA401 or LA404
  • LA508 - Advanced French II

    This advanced level course provides students an opportunity to hone their speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competencies through accessible Francophone literature and media. Targeted intensive grammar review and vocabulary development allow students to become more adept and flexible users of the language. To that end, composition work and the development of oral production skills are essential aspects of this course. Assessment focuses on their ability to transfer those linguistic skills to meaningful cultural contexts through a series of written and oral presentations. Each term, students will share one of their presentations with the greater community. This course will prepare students to take a 500-level French course in the fall term. Practice with the format and content of the SAT II exam is included when appropriate. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: All Prereqs: LA507
  • LA509 - Advanced French III

    This advanced level course provides students an opportunity to hone their speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competencies through accessible Francophone literature and media. Targeted intensive grammar review and vocabulary development allow students to become more adept and flexible users of the language. To that end, composition work and the development of oral production skills are essential aspects of this course. Assessment focuses on their ability to transfer those linguistic skills to meaningful cultural contexts through a series of written and oral presentations. Each term, students will share one of their presentations with the greater community. This course will prepare students to take a 500-level French course in the fall term. Practice with the format and content of the SAT II exam is included when appropriate. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: All Prereqs: LA508
  • LA510 - Advanced Spanish I

    In this course students develop and polish their expository and creative writing skills while strengthening their ability to closely read a text. Students learn how to sustain an extended conversation with multiple interlocutors in Spanish. In order to accomplish these goals, the course uses written texts, art and short films that cover a wide range of topics. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: All Prereqs: LA411
  • LA511 - Advanced Spanish II

    In this course students develop and polish their expository and creative writing skills while strengthening their ability to closely read a text. Students learn how to sustain an extended conversation with multiple interlocutors in Spanish. In order to accomplish these goals, the course uses written texts, art and short films that cover a wide range of topics. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: All Prereqs: LA510
  • LA512 - Advanced Spanish III

    In this course students develop and polish their expository and creative writing skills while strengthening their ability to closely read a text. Students learn how to sustain an extended conversation with multiple interlocutors in Spanish. In order to accomplish these goals, the course uses written texts, art and short films that cover a wide range of topics. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: All Prereqs: LA511
  • LA561 - Honors French: Journey Into The Francophone World

    Francophone means French-speaking. The Francophone world is comprised of many countries where French is used as one of the official languages and as one of the languages of education. The word was made popular in the 1960's by Léopold Sédar Senghor, first president of Senegal. Today, two of every three Francophone people in the world live outside France and greatly contribute to the universality of their language through their works. Students will enjoy the diversity of Francophone literatures. Film excerpts and specific websites will help them get more familiar with the cultures of Francophone countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and the Caribbean. Grants: Honors; NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: All Prereqs: LA562 or LA568
  • LA562 - Honors French: France Contemporaine

    In this course, students will explore modern France and the evolving social, political, and economical landscape of France in the 21st century. Through examining cultural practices and everyday life, students will be challenged to think about what it means to be French in a modern globalized world. Students will be exposed to authentic materials, including literature, films, TV and talk shows, podcasts, and news articles. Topics such as immigration and modern family dynamics, art, sports and media, education and technology, will be discussed, but others might be chosen to reflect current developments in the language and expressed student interests. The emphasis of the course will be on oral expression and students in the class should be comfortable debating and discussing topics exclusively in French. In addition, students will be asked to complete projects, papers, and video logs for specific units. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: All Prereqs: LA509
  • LA566 - Honors French: The Ninth Art

    The American term "comic strip" does not hint at the literary and artistic development of what in France is called the "neuvième art". The French term "bande dessinée" means literally "drawn strip" and for over one hundred years this genre, combining text and image, has developed into a rich and varied art form. This course will study this narrative art form beginning with a brief historical orientation followed by a close reading of three of the most well-known BD: both Tintin and Astérix have been translated into hundreds of languages and are read around the world, whereas the third BD, Manon des sources, is more literary. Grants: Honors; Terms: T1; Forms: All Prereqs: LA404, LA492 or LA509
  • LA585 - Honors Spanish: Contemporary Themes and Expression

    In this course, students will learn about present-day themes and topics relevant to Spanish speakers, both abroad and in the United States. They will read online articles, listen to podcasts and watch videos about current events. In addition, students will create a blog about a topic of their choice, learn to write blog posts, record podcasts and produce their own stories/narratives with video. Grants: Honors; Terms: T2; Forms: All Prereqs: LA495 or LA511
  • LA594 - Honors Spanish: Improvisaciones

    As with jazz, improvisation can happen once the basics of the discipline are mastered. This honors elective draws on students' foundational skills and invites them to stretch further by creating scenarios, characters, and conversational phrases they can incorporate into improvisational skits. (No prior acting experience needed!) Grants: Honors; Terms: T3; Forms: All Prereqs: LA495 or LA511
  • LA595 - Honors Spanish: Fiction And Reality

    The discovery of the Americas started a culture shock that still echoes today. It was then that the "painful birth that is now the nation of Mexico" took place. Two worlds saw each other for the first time, as Carlos Fuentes says, in a distorted mirror. In this seminar the students will study the blurry line that separates fiction/fantasy from reality by reading stories from the "Boom group" like GarcÌa Marquez, Julio Cortazar and more modern literature like Ruiz ZafÛn and films like "Como Agua para Chocolate" and "El Laberinto del Fauno". The final goal of the class is to write a 1,800 words short story that will mirror the ideas, images and themes studied in the class. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: All Prereqs: LA495 or LA511
  • LA597 - Honors Spanish: News and Culture

    This course will be based on the current events of Spain, Latin America, and the Latino community in the U.S. Since that will by its nature vary, the other part of the course will address themes and issues in Spain and Latin America that will provide both a historical perspective for any news as well as explore cultural facets (using among other sources: magazine articles, movies, and TV shows). Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: All Prereqs: LA495 or LA511
  • LA599 - Ind. Study: Language

    Students with special interests they wish to explore outside the regular program of courses may apply for an independent study. This may involve research or creative work; normally it will culminate in a paper, exhibit, or performance of some kind. Work in such projects is treated exactly like work in regular courses: a final grade is given; students must meet regularly (at least once a week) with their advisor; they must have tangible progress to report at each meeting. Grants: Honors; Terms: T1 or T2 or T3; Forms: All Prereqs: Department Approval
  • IN525 - Honors French: French Cinema

    From the very beginnings of cinema, France has produced internationally recognized films, and many historians consider France as the birthplace of cinema. France is also responsible for many early significant contributions to film and for the creation of important cinematic movements. Today, France continues to have a strong film industry due, in part, to measures undertaken by the French government to protect it. The course will follow the development of the film industry from the 1930's through the present. Students will watch films representing each significant period and/or film movement; they will become familiar with the appropriate cinema terminology and will be introduced to general rules governing film critique. Grants: Honors; Terms: T3; Forms: All Prereqs: LA562, LA566 or IN526
  • IN528 - Honors Spanish: Politics & Poetry

    This interdisciplinary course explores Nicaragua and its unique link: politics and poetry. Covering a chronological view of historical events and poets, students will read primary documents, discuss and write about events and topics, and participate in several group and individual projects using Spanish. Some select, lengthy history readings may be done in English. Available to IVth and Vth Forms only. Grants: Honors Interdisciplinary NCAA 1IN/1LA Cr.; Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: HI301 and LA495 or LA511
  • ES511 - Arabic

    Arabic is a team-taught online class that integrates synchronous and asynchronous web tools in teaching and learning. Students work with a variety of online media to master the Arabic alphabet and sounds, build vocabulary, develop speaking and listening skills, and acquire grammar concepts at the basic level. Students learn how to speak about themselves, their families and their environment, to initiate and sustain conversations, and to compose several paragraphs related to their daily routine. Students also read authentic short texts on familiar topics and discuss their main ideas. This course focuses on Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to Levantine colloquial through music, songs, and short videos. By the end of the course, students gain a solid command of linguistic structures and skills in Modern Standard Arabic at the basic level as well as a deeper understanding and appreciation of Arab culture and art. Students’ progress is assessed through performance on weekly assignments and projects. This course is offered by the Eight Schools Association and is taught by a teacher from Choate Rosemary Hall and another from Deerfield Academy. Grants: Honors; Terms: All; Forms: lV or V; Prereqs: Completion of Language Requirement and Department Approval
  • ES512 - Arabic

    Arabic is a team-taught online class that integrates synchronous and asynchronous web tools in teaching and learning. Students work with a variety of online media to master the Arabic alphabet and sounds, build vocabulary, develop speaking and listening skills, and acquire grammar concepts at the basic level. Students learn how to speak about themselves, their families and their environment, to initiate and sustain conversations, and to compose several paragraphs related to their daily routine. Students also read authentic short texts on familiar topics and discuss their main ideas. This course focuses on Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to Levantine colloquial through music, songs, and short videos. By the end of the course, students gain a solid command of linguistic structures and skills in Modern Standard Arabic at the basic level as well as a deeper understanding and appreciation of Arab culture and art. Students’ progress is assessed through performance on weekly assignments and projects. This course is offered by the Eight Schools Association and is taught by a teacher from Choate Rosemary Hall and another from Deerfield Academy. Grants: Honors; Terms: All; Forms: lV or V; Prereqs: Completion of Language Requirement and Department Approval
  • ES513 - Arabic

    Arabic is a team-taught online class that integrates synchronous and asynchronous web tools in teaching and learning. Students work with a variety of online media to master the Arabic alphabet and sounds, build vocabulary, develop speaking and listening skills, and acquire grammar concepts at the basic level. Students learn how to speak about themselves, their families and their environment, to initiate and sustain conversations, and to compose several paragraphs related to their daily routine. Students also read authentic short texts on familiar topics and discuss their main ideas. This course focuses on Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to Levantine colloquial through music, songs, and short videos. By the end of the course, students gain a solid command of linguistic structures and skills in Modern Standard Arabic at the basic level as well as a deeper understanding and appreciation of Arab culture and art. Students’ progress is assessed through performance on weekly assignments and projects. This course is offered by the Eight Schools Association and is taught by a teacher from Choate Rosemary Hall and another from Deerfield Academy. Grants: Honors; Terms: All; Forms: lV or V; Prereqs: Completion of Language Requirement and Department Approval
  • IN526 - Honors French: Versailles

    The palace and gardens of Versailles, as well as the art, poetry, music, and literature that it spawned, continue to delight visitors, spectators, and readers today. In the 17th century. Louis XIV undertook the construction not only of a palace, but also of a country: the palace and gardens of Versailles are the physical manifestation of Louis XIV's creation of the cultural and geographical France we know today. This course will use Versailles-the château, gardens, and court etiquette-to focus an exploration of the inspiring, intoxicating and, at times dangerous, intersection of art, science, politics, and literature in 17th century France. Students will study the historical period of Louis XIV's reign, read the poetry of La Fontaine as well as excerpts of plays by Molière, conduct research on a topic of their choosing, and prepare both written and oral presentations.
    Grants: Honors Interdisciplinary 1IN/1LA Cr.;   Terms: T2;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA561, LA562, LA566, LA568 or IN525
  • LA515 - Introduction to Ancient Greek

    This year long course offers students an intensive introduction to the language and culture of Ancient Greece and prepares students to read works by some of the best-known Greek authors, including Plato and Homer. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: Completion of Language graduation requirement and permission
  • LA524 - Honors Chinese: Modern Chinese Literature I

    This Honors Chinese course is designed to be parallel to the other newspaper-based Journalism course. The course is literature-based. Students are guided to read through carefully selected Chinese modern masterpieces and watch representative Chinese movies and documentary drama. Students are expected to participate in intense class discussions and work on writing assignments regularly. By taking this course, students have the opportunity to expand their knowledge and understanding of various perspectives of Chinese society at a certain historical stage. Students not only gain abundant training in Chinese writing, but also further strengthen their ability in Chinese reading and listening as well as speaking through group discussion and individual oral presentation. Grants: Honors NCAA;   Terms: T1;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA486 or LA506
  • LA525 - Honors Chinese: Modern Chinese Literature II

    This Honors Chinese course is designed to be parallel to the other newspaper-based Journalism course. The course is literature-based. Students are guided to read through carefully selected Chinese modern masterpieces and watch representative Chinese movies and documentary drama. Students are expected to participate in intense class discussions and work on writing assignments regularly. By taking this course, students have the opportunity to expand their knowledge and understanding of various perspectives of Chinese society at a certain historical stage. Students not only gain abundant training in Chinese writing, but also further strengthen their ability in Chinese reading and listening as well as speaking through group discussion and individual oral presentation. Grants: Honors NCAA;   Terms: T2;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA524
  • LA526 - Honors Chinese: Modern Chinese Literature III

    This Honors Chinese course is designed to be parallel to the other newspaper-based Journalism course. The course is literature-based. Students are guided to read through carefully selected Chinese modern masterpieces and watch representative Chinese movies and documentary drama. Students are expected to participate in intense class discussions and work on writing assignments regularly. By taking this course, students have the opportunity to expand their knowledge and understanding of various perspectives of Chinese society at a certain historical stage. Students not only gain abundant training in Chinese writing, but also further strengthen their ability in Chinese reading and listening as well as speaking through group discussion and individual oral presentation. Grants: Honors NCAA;   Terms: T3;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA525
  • LA530 - Honors Chinese: Chinese Literature and Society I

    Since the New Culture Movement (1910s-1920s), written vernacular Chinese () replaced classical Chinese in all areas of literature and writing, signaling the onset of the era of modern Chinese literature. Literature reflects society. Students will study carefully selected Chinese modern literary works (including fiction, poetry, drama, memoir and so forth) to further expand their knowledge and understanding of revolutionary changes in Chinese history and various aspects of Chinese society during different historical periods since the New Culture Movement. Students are expected participate in intense class discussions and write essays on a regular basis. In addition to gaining abundant training in Chinese writing, students also further strengthen their ability in Chinese reading and listening as well as speaking through group discussions and oral presentations. Grants: Honors;   Terms: T1;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA529
     
  • LA531 - Honors Chinese: Chinese Literature and Society II

    Since the New Culture Movement (1910s-1920s), written vernacular Chinese () replaced classical Chinese in all areas of literature and writing, signaling the onset of the era of modern Chinese literature. Literature reflects society. Students will study carefully selected Chinese modern literary works (including fiction, poetry, drama, memoir and so forth) to further expand their knowledge and understanding of revolutionary changes in Chinese history and various aspects of Chinese society during different historical periods since the New Culture Movement. Students are expected participate in intense class discussions and write essays on a regular basis. In addition to gaining abundant training in Chinese writing, students also further strengthen their ability in Chinese reading and listening as well as speaking through group discussions and oral presentations. Grants: Honors;   Terms: T2;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA530
     
  • LA532 - Honors Chinese: Chinese Literature and Society III

    Since the New Culture Movement (1910s-1920s), written vernacular Chinese (白话) replaced classical Chinese in all areas of literature and writing, signaling the onset of the era of modern Chinese literature. Literature reflects society. Students will study carefully selected Chinese modern literary works (including fiction, poetry, drama, memoir and so forth) to further expand their knowledge and understanding of revolutionary changes in Chinese history and various aspects of Chinese society during different historical periods since the New Culture Movement. Students are expected participate in intense class discussions and write essays on a regular basis. In addition to gaining abundant training in Chinese writing, students also further strengthen their ability in Chinese reading and listening as well as speaking through group discussions and oral presentations. Grants: Honors;   Terms: T3;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA531
  • LA541 - Honors Latin: Cicero And The Fall Of The Republic

    This class offers a thorough investigation into the life, thought, and writings of Marcus Tullius Cicero, who lived at the very end of the Roman Republic, and who strove to save the Republic from the ever-looming threat of tyranny.  Born into relatively meager circumstances in rural Italy, Cicero carefully climbed Rome’s social-political ladder and eventually held most of the Republic’s highest political offices.  He was a man of thought and of action, and accordingly, students in this class read examples of his speeches, his philosophical writings, his personal letters, and his official correspondence with the Senate. Grants: Honors NCAA;   Terms: T1;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA503 or permission of instructor.
  • LA542 - Honors Latin: Vergil And Roman Identity

    In this course, students read a selection of the most revered and admired passages in Vergil’s Aeneid in order to appreciate the artistry of Vergil’s poem and to develop their understanding of Augustan Rome and the early Roman Empire. In addition, students read the entire Aeneid in English translation, as well as works from other ancient authors, with the goal of placing Vergil in his historical and literary context. Grants: Honors NCAA;   Terms: T2;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA541 or permission of instructor.
  • LA543 - Honors Latin: Augustan Rome

    This course explores the rise and reign of the Emperor Augustus as he led Rome out of a dying Republic and created the forms of an Empire that would endure for millennia. Through close reading of literary texts (both in Latin and in English translation) and through careful analysis of Augustan art and architecture, students in this class study Augustus' attempts to recreate and renovate Roman society and Roman identity. Grants: Honors;   Terms: T3;   Forms: All Prereqs: LA542 or permission of instructor.
  • LA593 - Honors Spanish: Muralist of Mexico

    This course does not require prior knowledge of art history. In exploring artists' works and messages conveyed in the context of their world and time, we will explore three Mexican Muralists. To gain deeper understanding and appreciation students will read about each artist, their historical context, and the impact of these works of art in the creation of cultural identity. Students will describe and discuss these topics as well as do independent and collaborative projects and presentations.  Grants: Honors; Terms: T3; Forms: All Prereqs: LA495 or LA511
  • LA598 - Honors Spanish: Historia Hispana de Estados Unidos

    Florida was initially claimed by the Spanish. About one-third of the current continental United States originally belonged to Mexico. While U.S. history books often focus on our English origins, Spanish-speaking countries and peoples significantly contributed to the development of our country as well.   This course will explore our Hispanic roots, beginning in the early 16th century during the age of exploration, and continue through the centuries, concluding with the study of prominent Latin figures of the 20th century. Students will read first-person accounts of the Spanish explorers, watch history documentaries and create a final project for the end of the trimester. This honors elective will be taught in Spanish.  Grants: Honors; Terms: T3; Forms: All Prereqs: LA495 or LA511

Our Faculty

Through House and Harkness, Lawrenceville challenges a diverse community of promising young people to lead lives of learning, integrity, and high purpose.  Our mission is to inspire the best in each to seek the best for all.