Mathematics is the language of reason. Though often referred to as a single discipline, mathematics comprises many distinct fields, including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, number theory, probability, and statistics.
Each field has developed its own ways of thinking, its own methods for solving problems and establishing truth. Closer examination reveals the underlying logic that binds them all together. In addition to its inherent structure and beauty, mathematics helps us model the world around us. Whether we’re monitoring climate change, managing money, designing new buildings and bridges, buying insurance, testing the effectiveness of a new drug, or solving crime, math provides the tools we need to make decisions in the face of complexity, risk, and uncertainty.

Every Lawrenceville graduate should be able to interpret quantitative information, develop and apply mathematical models, formulate clear and convincing arguments, and use appropriate technology to solve problems and describe relationships. In each course, we seek to develop students’ mathematical reasoning and their ability to use the language of mathematics to communicate their ideas and observations. We encourage students to ask good questions, use multiple approaches, explore ideas, and notice connections. Our Harkness-style classrooms promote intellectual engagement: independent thinking and exploration, as well as effective collaboration. The Mathematics Department sees learning mathematics as a ‘gateway to reason’ and strives to help our students gain a greater appreciation for and command of the discipline, both for its value as a way of thinking and for its usefulness in other disciplines.

Explore Our Courses

Calculator Policy: A “TI-84 Plus CE Graphing Calculator” is required for all mathematics courses.
  • MA201 - Math 1

    Math 1 is a full year course covering skills and concepts necessary for success in high-school mathematics. Emphasis is placed on mathematical principles to support necessary symbol manipulation. Although the course assumes no previous experience with high-school algebra, it is still an excellent choice for students who have already taken a first year algebra course at their previous school, but who feel they need to strengthen their grasp of fundamental skills and ideas. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: II
  • IN530 - Honors Calculus with Physics

    Through an inquiry-based approach, this course explores key principles of physics and the calculus methods related to them. The study of each physics topic requires students to create hypotheses, develop computer models, design experiments, and craft components. Topics of calculus are introduced in support of this process, allowing students to model their understanding mathematically. Among the calculus topics included are derivatives and integrals and applications including velocity and acceleration, linearization, extreme values, accumulation, area, and volumes. Some independent study is required of students preparing for the AP® Calculus AB exam.
    Grants: Honors Interdisciplinary NCAA; 1IN/3MA Cr.; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA 407 or MA421 and SC321 co-requirement with IN531 **NOTE: Only one IN credit will be granted for the pair.
  • MA204 - Math 2

    Math 2 teaches students to make effective and convincing mathematical arguments. While our emphasis will be on the deductive reasoning of geometry, we will also explore the role of inductive reasoning in developing conjectures about the characteristics of geometric figures. Considerable attention will be given to applying geometric relationships to real-life situations. In addition, important skills from Algebra I are reviewed, emphasizing the reasoning. This course also initiates an exploration of geometric probability. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: II or III Prereqs: MA201
  • MA301 - Math 3

    Math 3 is a yearlong course that introduces the language, notation, and methodology of mathematics necessary for the creation of algebraic models. We pay particular attention to the reasoning on which algebraic methods are based. Topics include working with algebraic expressions and equations; linear, quadratic, exponential, and power functions; logarithms; and basic triangle trigonometry. We will also explore the fundamentals of probability and statistics.
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: II or III or IV Prereqs: MA201 and (MA204 or MA221) 
  • MA321 - Math 3X

    Math 3X is a yearlong course that explores the language, notation and methodology of mathematics necessary for the creation of convincing mathematical arguments. We pay particular attention to the reasoning on which algebraic methods are based. Topics include working with algebraic expressions, equations and inequalities; linear, quadratic, absolute value, power, exponential and logarithmic functions; and the fundamentals of conic sections, combinatorics, probability and statistics.
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; forms: II or III or IV; Prereqs: MA201 and MA204
  • MA404 - Math 4

    This course is designed to strengthen students’ algebraic fluency as they examine the important characteristics of linear, quadratic, exponential, polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions. The connection between arithmetic and geometric sequences and linear and exponential functions will be explored. Students will use these families of functions to solve a  variety of application problems. Strategic use of technology will be encouraged throughout the course. 
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: III or IV or V; Prereqs: MA301 
  • MA407 - Precalculus

    Precalculus involves the study of the elementary functions (linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, power, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric), their multiple representations (words, formulas, graphs, and numerical tables), their salient characteristics, and ways of using them to model real-world phenomena. 
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: MA301 or MA404 
  • MA411 - Statistics

    How do scientists establish truth? They produce data through observation and experiments. Individual measurements vary, even in seemingly identical conditions. Descriptive statistics provides graphical and numerical tools for modeling variation in data. In well-designed studies, inferential statistics allows researchers to draw conclusions about the world at large from the data at hand. Probability answers the critical question "what are the chances?" In this course, students will master the art and science of making decisions with data. 
    Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA404 or MA407 or (MA301 and department approval) 
  • MA421 - Precalculus BC

    This course includes all of the topics covered in Precalculus, but examines them in greater depth and at an accelerated pace. During the winter and spring terms, students are exposed to additional content that prepares them to take Honors Calculus BC the following year, including a comprehensive introduction to limits, continuity, and derivatives. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: MA301
  • MA451 - Calculus

    This course provides an introduction to the major ideas of calculus. Key topics include derivatives and their applications in curve sketching, optimization, and related rates, as well as integrals (antiderivatives) and their applications in solving differential equations, modeling accumulation, and determining areas and volumes. In this course, students will actively engage in exploratory projects and collaborative investigations to study calculus. The use of technology (graphing calculator, Desmos, and Geogebra) will be prioritized over traditional algebraic solving techniques to help visualize solution methods. Successful completion of this course will require an ability to communicate reasoning both verbally and on paper. Gaining an understanding of differential and integral calculus will equip students with confidence and a knowledge base to pursue further study of calculus. Grants: NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: III or IV or V; Prereqs: MA404 or MA407
  • MA504 - Honors Calculus AB

    The course is a thorough examination of change-instantaneous rates of change (differential calculus) and the ongoing accumulation of change (integral calculus). Beginning from discussion of the meaning and interpretation of these concepts, methods for determining the derivatives and integrals of elementary functions are introduced, and students' skill with those methods is developed in various contexts. Applications of the derivative and integral are emphasized from symbolic, graphical, numerical, and descriptive perspectives. This course prepares students for the AP® exam in May, and all students are required to take the exam.
     Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: MA407 or MA421
  • MA511 - Honors Statistics

    Statistics is the art and science of drawing conclusions from data. In Honors Statistics, students will learn to: apply the principles and methods of data production, data analysis, probability models, and inference appropriately in a variety of settings; design and carry out a statistical study to answer a research question of interest; analyze and critique published statistical information; and communicate statistical reasoning effectively, both orally and in writing. This course prepares students for the AP® exam in May, and all students are required to take the exam.
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA301
  • MA521 - Honors Calculus BC

    The course will cover all the topics described in MA504 Honors Calculus AB, with only a quick review of the ideas of limits, continuity, and derivatives that were part of Precalculus BC. Many additional topics will be covered including more sophisticated methods of integration, polar coordinates, and extensive work with infinite series and vector-valued functions. This course prepares students for the AP® exam in May, and all students are required to take the exam.
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: All Prereqs: MA407 or MA421
  • MA527 - Honors Calculus-Based Prob & Stats

    Statistics is the art and science of drawing conclusions from data. Probability is the study of chance behavior, while Calculus provides the methodological basis in both disciplines. This course blends probability theory and mathematical statistics with real-world applications. Students will: apply the principles of data analysis, probability models, and inference in a variety of settings; use calculus and other mathematical techniques to develop key results; and communicate statistical and probabilistic reasoning both orally and in writing. Students who wish to take the AP® exam in May will need to do some independent preparation outside of class.
    Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: All; Forms: III or IV or V; Prereqs: IN530 or MA 504 or MA 507 or MA 521
  • MA532 - Honors Math Seminar: Linear Algebra

    This course introduces the essential ideas of vectors, matrices, linear systems of equations, determinants, eigenvectors and eigenvalues. The applications of these concepts are both illuminating and elegant, and will provide needed resources to solve sophisticated and abstract mathematical problems. These ideas form the building blocks needed for Multivariable Calculus in the winter, and Differential Equations in the spring. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T1; Forms: III or IV or V Prereqs: IN530 or MA504 or MA507 or MA521 and (MA511 or MA527 or MA555 complete or concurrent)
  • MA536 - Honors Math Seminar: Multivariable Calculus

    This course is an investigation of how the notions of differentiation and integration studied in single-variable calculus extend to functions of several variables. It is a gentle qualitative introduction to the subject and is not meant to replace the rigorous college version. Topics studied include vectors and vector fields, differentiation, optimization, and the definite integral. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T2; Forms: III or IV or V Prereqs: Prereqs: IN530 or MA 504 or MA 507 or MA 521 AND (MA511 OR MA527 OR MA555 complete or concurrent)
  • MA537 - Honors Math Seminar: Differential Equations

    This course will cover techniques used to solve some of the most interesting problems in mathematics, physics, economics, and computer science. Appreciation of the power of some of its analytical, numerical, and graphical methods will certainly be part of the emphasis of the course. Computer software capable of solving and exploring differential equations will be used to enhance understanding and help in the solution of problems. The course will revolve around applications to real life situations. Grants: Honors NCAA; Terms: T3; Forms: III or IV or V Prereqs: IN 530 or MA504 or MA507 or MA521 and (MA511 or MA527 or MA555 complete or concurrent)
  • MA551 - Statistical Reasoning In Sports

    Did Lebron James choke in the playoffs? Should you go for it on fourth down? Is it more important to hit a tee shot long or to hit it straight? What effect did steroid testing have on baseball statistics? These questions and others will be addressed through the principles of statistical reasoning. The course will present all of the common types of graphs and summary statistics as well as the design of experiments and the calculation of probabilities. It will also cover the logic of inference and how to account for variability when making decisions. Grants: Honors; Terms: T2; Forms: V; Prereqs: MA301 and (MA404 or MA407 or MA421 or MA504 or MA507 or MA521 or IN530 concurrent)
  • MA555 - Honors Computer Programming

    This course is designed to exploit natural connections between mathematics and programming. Bringing mathematics to programming and programming to mathematics, we attempt to realize synergies between the two disciplines. The Mathematica platform allows us to build visual models of complex problems, and, in the process, gain some understanding of the underlying mathematics, like vectors and vector transformations. Pedagogically, as much as possible, class time is hands-on, and, as the course progresses, exercises become more independent, creative, and complex.  Note that this is designed as a yearlong course, but students may opt to sign up for MA555 and MA556 in the fall and winter terms, and for MA570 in the spring term. Students who wish to take the AP® exam in May will need to do some independent preparation outside of class.
    Grants: Honors; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA301
  • MA561 - Javascript Programming

    Coding is the literacy for the 21st Century and applicable to almost any field of study or work. In this course, students will learn how to program using the Javascript programming language. Topics covered include basic language syntax, data types, program organization, algorithm design, control structures, and graphics. Although students with a programming background are welcome to take this course, it is meant for students with little or no background in the Javascript programming language. This course will prepare you to take MA563 Projects in Computer Programming in the Spring term. Students may also elect to take MA562 Python Programming in the winter term. Grants NCAA: Terms: T1; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA301
  • MA562 - Python Programming

    Coding is the literacy for the 21st Century and applicable to almost any field of study or work. In this course, students will learn how to program using the Python programming language. Topics include programming language syntax, data types, program organization, algorithm design, and control structures, and some more advanced data science and machine learning tools. Although students with a programming background are welcome to take this course, it is meant for students with little or no background in the Python programming language. This course will prepare you to take MA563 Projects in Computer Programming in the Spring term. Grants NCAA: Terms: T2; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA301
  • MA563 - Projects in Computer Programming

    Coding is the literacy for the 21st Century and applicable to almost any field of study or work. In this course, students will code, debug, and present a programming application of their design. This course is open to students who have taken either of the 1-term programming electives (MA561 or MA562) or who can demonstrate sufficient mastery of a programming language that they will be able to sustain and complete a 1-term programming project. Although students will have opportunities to collaborate on projects with other students, the expectation is that students will have the initiative and resourcefulness to be able to work on their projects independently. Grants NCAA: Terms: T3; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: MA561 or MA562, or departmental approval.
  • MA599 - Ind. Study: Math

    Students with special interests they wish to explore outside the regular program of courses may apply for an independent study. This may involve research or creative work; normally it will culminate in a paper, exhibit, or performance of some kind. Work in such projects is treated exactly like work in regular courses: a final grade is given; students must meet regularly (at least once a week) with their advisor; they must have tangible progress to report at each meeting. Grants: Honors; Terms: All; Forms: IV or V; Prereqs: Department Approval

Our Faculty

Through House and Harkness, Lawrenceville challenges a diverse community of promising young people to lead lives of learning, integrity, and high purpose.  Our mission is to inspire the best in each to seek the best for all.